First Quarter 2021

Happy New Year! Welcome to our first quarterly newsletter! Glad 2020 is behind us? We all are! Here’s hoping 2021 brings you new happiness, new goals, new achievements, and many new inspirations to your life. What New Year’s resolutions did you make? No more sweets? Hike more? Take a CERT class? Whatever you’ve decided to accomplish, remember this… you can do it! 

Just a little bit about us… the Arvada Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) is a volunteer team created in partnership with the City of Arvada, Arvada Police Department, and Arvada Fire Protection District. There are more than 50 volunteers on the team. 

Events

Unplanned – neighborhood canvassing upon Police Department and Arvada Fire Protection District requests. 

1Q21 

Assisting Jefferson County Public Health 3 days a week with drive thru vaccination process for First Responders/Health Care Workers Tentative 

2Q21 

Mid-April – Headstart – walking with the kids from Headstart to their evacuation place and back.

Winter Emergency Preparedness 

Some winter emergencies that could happen are traveling in a snowstorm and your vehicle breaks down, hiking a snow-covered trail and you get lost, or losing your heat on a frigid day. There are other types of disasters and hazards that could affect you or your area, so it is best to know what they are and keep yourself informed. 

The next time an emergency situation or disaster strikes, you may not have much time to act. Protect yourself, ensure your safety and cope with an emergency or disaster by planning ahead. Take charge now!

1. Make-a-plan – preparedness begins in the home. Develop your family plan, which includes having a well-stocked emergency kit at home, in your vehicle, and at work. A great way for parents to set an example is by teaching their kids the importance of having a plan, and practice, practice, practice!! 

2. Stay informed – Get Tech Ready – technology has made it a lot easier than ever before to prepare yourself for an emergency, but it can be unreliable in an emergency if you have not kept your devices powered up and protected. Register with the Red Cross, download specific apps, sign-up to receive text messages (standard message and data rates apply), use social media and emails are great ways to stay informed. Check out this website for more information on how to stay informed: www.ready.gov/get-tech-ready.

3. Volunteer – Get Involved – previous disasters and emergencies have caused many of us to wonder how we can help prepare our communities. Through Citizen Corps and community volunteering, we all can learn about opportunities to get involved and help build capacity for first responders. With proper training and education, we as civilian volunteers can expand the resources available to states and local communities. Many partner organizations offer public education, outreach, and training for free, such as: 

Do You Know How the Cold Temperatures May Impact Your Body? 

1. Frostbite occurs when tissues freeze. This condition happens when you are exposed to temperatures below the freezing point of skin. Everyone is susceptible to frostbite. It can cause loss of feeling and color around the face (nose, cheeks, ears), fingers and toes. 

  • Signs of frostbite: numbness, white or grayish-yellow skin, firm, or waxy skin. 
  • What to do if you have frostbite: go to a warm room. Soak in warm water. Use body heat to warm. Do not massage, use a heating pad, or hot water. Seek medical attention as soon as possible.
  • Pets can get frostbite too! 
    • Dogs and frostbite 
      • Dog frostbite can be prevented by avoiding prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Additionally, dog apparel like dog jackets, sweaters, boots, and other accessories can help to protect dogs, especially for breeds with thinner fur and those less used to cold weather.
  • Cats and frostbite 
      • It is best to keep your cat inside when the weather is cold. If your cat happens to be outside in severe weather, make sure your cat has access to shelter that protects him/her from wind and snow (or rain), and has straw or blankets to hold warmth. 
      • Here’s a DIY for making a pretty inexpensive outdoor shelter per Alley Cat Advocates.

2. Hypothermia is potentially a dangerous drop in body temperature, usually caused by prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Normal body temperature averages 98.6 degrees. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency. In severe hypothermia, core body temperature can drop to 82 degrees or lower. 

  • Signs of hypothermia: Shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, drowsiness, slow/weak pulse, or slow/shallow breathing. 
  • What to do if you have hypothermia: hypothermia is a potentially life-threatening condition that needs emergency medical attention. 
    • Until you can get the proper medical attention needed, go to a warm room. Warm the center of the body first – chest, neck, head, and groin. Keep dry and wrapped up in warm blankets, including the head and neck. Drink warm liquids, but avoid alcohol and caffeine, which speeds up heat loss. 
  • Pets can get hypothermia too! 
    • Dogs and hypothermia 
      • Hypothermia in dogs can be prevented by avoiding prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. This is especially important for dogs who are considered to be at risk. Factors that increase a dog’s risk for hypothermia include being very young or old, low body fat, heart disease, kidney disease and hypothyroidism. ▪ Additionally, dog apparel like dog jackets, sweaters, boots, and other accessories can help to protect dogs, especially for breeds with thinner fur and those less used to cold weather. 
    • Cats and hypothermia 
      • It is best to keep your cat inside when the weather is cold. If your cat happens to be outside in severe weather, make sure your cat has access to shelter that protects him/her from wind and snow (or rain), and has straw or blankets to hold warmth. Here’s a DIY for making a pretty inexpensive outdoor shelter per Alley Cat Advocates.

1Q21 Upcoming CERT Meetings (2nd Wednesday of each month): 

  1. February 10th – postponed
  2. March 10th – Zoom meeting

Want to Further Your FEMA Training? Take the Following Online Courses: 

  1. IS-200.C: Basic Incident Command System for Initial Response – is an updated version of the IS-200 course. If you have successfully completed IS-200.b or IS-200.a, you may want to review the new version of the course. 
  2. IS-800.D: National Response Framework, An Introduction
  1. Arvada CERT – website 
  2. Arvada CERT – Facebook 
  3. Arvada CERT – City of Arvada 
  4. Resolve to be Ready – an official website of the US Government 
  5. Need to contact CERT?
  6. Newsletter contact – Sue Jirousek

Joke Corner: 

Q: Why did Frosty the snowman want a divorce? 
A: Because he thought his wife was a flake 

Q: Why was the snowman sad? 
A: Cause he had a meltdown. 

Q: What do you call fifty penguins in the Arctic? 
A: Lost! REALLY lost! (Penguins live in Antarctica.) 

Q: How do mountains stay warm? 
A: They put on their snowcaps. 

Q: What sort of ball doesn’t bounce? 
A: A snowball! 

Q: What do you call a slow skier? 
A: A slowpoke! 

If you have any topics, ideas, jokes, etc. for future newsletter issues, please email – Sue Jirousek